2015 NATIONAL INDIGENOUS CONFERENCES

CAIRNS * GOLD COAST * DARWIN

MEDIA RELEASES

January 12,2016

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR THE 2016 STOLEN GENERATION CONFERENCE

The Sovereign Union of First Nations of Australia in collaboration with Indigenous Conference Services (ICS-MEES Pty Ltd) is proud and honoured to host the 2016 National Stolen Generation: Bringing Them Home Conference to be held at the Grand Mercure Resort in the Gold Coast on 24th – 26th August 2016.

As part of our commitment to our community, we are calling for papers for the 2016 Stolen Generation: Bringing Them Home Conference so that we may engage with the community and members of the public who are either have interest in or had been affected by issues regarding the removal of Indigenous children both in the past and in the present. Papers are being called for the areas of community initiatives in relation to healing, reintegration of individuals and groups affected by previous and current government policies, sharing of testimony and personal journeys, music and songs for the background or soundtrack of the conference, successful community programs highlighting initiatives which brings us to where the future is leads us, papers which showcases how government policies affect us today and projects which promotes the establishment of Stolen Generation networks. These are broad parameters that will be sought for as part of the proposed conference agenda so that it gives everybody an opportunity to actively participate and submit a paper for the conference.

The overarching aim for the conference is to assist with the journey of healing and to act as an open and frank discussion and forum where not just ideas are shared but also have the potential of further uniting First Nations peoples of Australia and to highlight to government that our journey is far from complete.

This year’s national conference is a lead up to the 2017 World Stolen Generations Conference which coincides with Australia’s 20th Anniversary of the Bringing Them Home report. To submit a paper, authors are invited to submit their entry online upon reading and checking the below criteria:

Guidelines in Submitting Paper:

  • Papers should not contain offensive language and take into account cultural sensitivities of host Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander country.
  • Papers may treat the themes in a manner that contributes to further discussion of conference aims.
  • Conference papers must be presented in the finish format not less than 60 days prior to the event.
  • First round of papers closing date will be on February 28, 2016. Papers that are not chosen in the first round may be resubmitted in the second round.
  • Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word format accompanied with brief biography and passport size ID photo of the presenter/s.
  • Authors of papers presented at the conference will be formally notified of their acceptance. Presenters must acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land at the start of their presentations.
  • Registration fee of $650 will apply to all persons submitting papers payable upon acceptance of papers.
  • Papers should explore ways in which the themes show up in the philosophy of the conference. All papers must be presented in a positive and informative light.
  • www.indigenousconferences.comadminics@iinet.net.au




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January 05, 2016


"Call for Papers for the 2016 International Indigenous Allied Health Conference"

ICS Australia is proud to announce the launch of its 2016 International Indigenous Allied Health Conference to be held at the Pullman Cairns Hotel on the 1st- 3rd December 2016. Inspired by the huge success of the International & National Indigenous Health Conferences held in Cairns Queensland Australia for three consecutive years, ICS has now broaden the scope because of the interests shown from Indigenous Allied Health workers worldwide. ICS strives to provide a variety of sessions that focus on issues relevant to allied health professionals. Therefore, we are currently calling for papers with the closing date on the 30th January 2016 to include topics that were identified by past conference attendees as being the most needed and beneficial to their practice; thus, abstracts covering topics below will be given special consideration:

Innovative Technology in Allied Health Practice

Creative Strategies in Distance Education & Placement

Person-Centred Versus Strength-Based Models of Care

Advanced Scope of Practice

Innovative Diabetes Initiatives

From research to evidence-based practice

Workforce development - motivating Staff

Best Practices in Re-enablement and Wellness

Creating & Maintaining Program Effectiveness Plans

Allied Health Private Practice Marketing & Profile

Discuss and build strategies to create and support energetic interdisciplinary teams

Strategising healthcare approaches to meet current challenges

The multidisciplinary team approach - doctors & allied health professionals

Making strides in clinical excellence

Coping with global trends in non-communicable diseases

Laboratory technologies - advances & innovations

Enhancing competency of allied health professionals

IT/ICT as enablers in facilitating work process

Explore the power of storytelling and related linguistic elements (i.e. anecdote, mnemonic, metaphor and analogy) as tools for effective patient engagement.

The 2016 International Indigenous Allied Health Conference offers high quality, diverse professional development education sessions from high calibre allied health professionals, leading industry experts and First Nations guest speakers from around the globe gathering under one roof as well as offers unparalleled valuable networking opportunities. As an added bonus, ICS is offering a delegate who attends this year’s Indigenous Health Conference will be given a special discounted rate of $650 for the whole 4 day event in 2016. The conference also highlights inspiring initiatives, successes and challenges faced by allied health workers from not only in Australia but internationally. The conference aims to take you on a transformative journey of education and inspiration, empowering you to excel in your allied health practice. Your experience during the event's educational workshops and keynote sessions will enable you to come away empowered with the latest knowledge & information and gain insights as well as obtain knowledge from innovative research and service developments that may transform how services are delivered in years to come. Allied health is one of the most valued members in multidisciplinary team in healthcare and forms one of the three pillars of the patient care workforce. This will ensures allied health professionals are able to empower patients, drive faster recoveries, and create an efficient and effective health system that promotes the current trends of re-enablement and wellness approaches in health practice.

WHY ATTEND

The conference will enable you to discover new strategies for better serving your clients and experiencing unparalleled professional and personal growth. The event offers more than 60 sessions with engaging and inspiring keynote speakers, workshop sessions and unparalleled networking opportunities.

Guidelines in Submitting Paper:

Papers should not contain offensive language and take into account cultural sensitivities of host country.

Papers may treat the themes in a manner that contributes to further discussion of conference aims.

Conference papers must be presented in the finish format not less than 60 days prior to the event.

First round of papers closing date will be on the 30th September, 2015. Papers that are not chosen in the first round may be resubmitted in the second round.

Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word format.

Authors of papers presented at the conference will be formally notified of their acceptance.

Registration fee of $650 will apply to all persons submitting papers payable upon acceptance of papers.

Papers should explore ways in which the themes show up in the philosophy of the conference.

All papers must be presented in a positive and informative light.

For more information, please visit the conference website at www.indigenousconferences.com or contact us by email at adminics@iinet.net.au



15th January 2014 Hervey Bay QLD Australia 

Calling for Papers for the 2014 World Indigenous Health Conference to be held at Pullman Cairns International in Cairns, Australia on 15th – 17th December 2014

 

Following the successful staging of the 2013 Australian National Indigenous Health Conference, it has been decided that once every three years, the conference would be a full international First Peoples conference. The venue for this year’s international conference will be organized in Cairns, Queensland. The highlights of the 2014 international event will endeavour would be the gathering of more than five hundred First Nations Peoples from all around the world as well as the integration of nature, nurture & pleasure with First Peoples keynote speakers and plenary sessions mixed with options to go on an educational nature tour in the Avatar-inspired and lush world heritage listed Cairns rainforest.  For the more adventurous ones, options of hovering over the rainforest on the Sky Rail or hover over the corals and numerous marine species in the world famous, Great Barrier Reef!

 

The 2014 International Indigenous Health Conference is scheduled to be held at the 5-star Pullman Cairns International which is centrally located in the heart of tropical Cairns, within walking distance to cruise terminal, Cairns lagoon pool, shopping centres, railway station and just 8 kilometres from Cairns International Airport.

 

The event is based upon the principal beliefs of most Indigenous Peoples wherein the relationship between our cultural heritage together with the relationship to our spiritual lands provide the basis for the guidelines in the treatment of our individual healing. The conference recognizes that treating our health must be done by treating the whole person in a holistic approach through mind, body, soul and culture. No matter which country you come from throughout this world, if you are a First Nations person, the statistics whether it be health, education, or the justice system is monstrously worst than a non-Indigenous individual.  Nowadays Indigenous peoples have diverse range of lifestyle from city dwellers to remote bush isolated communities. The conference itself is not designed to provide answers for everybody however it is designed to bring together both government and non-government agencies who are working in the field of Indigenous health with the belief that working together can close the gap between the state of Indigenous Health as compared to the health of mainstream. It is envisage that up to 300 delegates will attend the 2014 International Indigenous Health Conference which is scheduled on 15th – 17th of December 2014 in Cairns, Australia.

 

For many years, the provision of Aboriginal health services had been broken and fragmented when it comes to delivery of primary health services. There were government providers and grassroots communities’ Aboriginal medical services where in many cases, duplication of services occurred. However over time, service providers have joined forces in, not just the physical provision of services but also in such fields as research, health education and even the training of staffs in order to improve Indigenous health.

 

This gathering will highlight some of the existing Indigenous health programs currently implemented in Aboriginal communities all over the world and provide a unique opportunity for delegates and speakers to see the power of people networking together in one place, at one time with similar goals and exchange information regarding the successes and challenges that workers involve in implementing Aboriginal health programs faced. Hence, we encourage grassroots communities to participate and present their existing, successful programs during the event.

 

To ensure grassroots community programs are highlighted, no less than 50 percent of the conference proceedings are and is devoted to community groups. Papers are now being called for with the first closing date on the 28thof February 2014. To further ensure the continuous success of the conference, an Indigenous working group is being established to advise the committee on correct adherence to cultural equilibrium.  The conference is not political based rather should be seen as an opportunity to access information that is not readily available at your own level.

 

Today, the world has become smaller with the invention of the internet however the internet has also manage to sterilized and isolate people at the same time. As such, we are of the belief that there is nothing more empowering and more efficient than for workers to have an opportunity to network and meet. The conference may or may not save you or your organization time, money and manpower however, one thing the event guarantees is the opportunity to enlarge your network and information base thus empowering the delegates to make greater informed decisions.

 

Furthermore it has been proven time and time again that events such as this empowers and reinvigorates workers with new ideas and with enthusiasm, with a greater feeling of support and contacts that may be utilised for the betterment of their own or local community. With all this in mind, we invite you to actively participate in the event.

 

For more information, please visithttp://www.indigenoushealth.net/submitapaper.htm or send us an email at admin@indigenoushealth.net

 

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NEWSLETTER October 15, 2013 


Pullman Cairns International Hotel is ready to accommodate more than 200 delegates of the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference in Cairns on 25-27th November

" The stage is set for the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference: Building Bridges for Indigenous Health at the Pullman Cairns International Hotel in Cairns, Queensland, Australia scheduled for the 25th– 27th November 2013."

 

All necessary arrangements had been completed and the stage is set for the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference: Building Bridges for Indigenous Health at the Pullman Cairns International Hotel in Cairns, Queensland, Australia scheduled for the 25th– 27th November 2013. With the unlimited support and guidance of our Indigenous Advisory Board and the exclusive sponsorship of the Indigenous Offender Health Research Capacity Building Group, this conference is set to be a success!

 

This year’s conference generates international interests from First Nation’s Peoples throughout the world. One of the additional highlights of the event will be the presentation about a major and common issue throughout the Indigenous native groups of Alaska involving the loss of culture, language, respect, ceremonies and so on. By working with the Indigenous spiritual technique of calling home, a community can reconnect with its roots and ancestors to effect a change. The Traditional Healing and the Health of the Tribe shall be presented by Debra Chesnut of the USA who was raised in Anchorage, Alaska in an Alaskan Bush on one of the last homesteads allowed under the Federal Homestead Act where her father flew his 2-seater airplane to Anchorage to work because there were no roads connecting them to other communities. Debra graduated Magna Cum Laude from Nursing School at the University of Alaska, Anchorage in 1976 and worked in a variety of places as a nurse around Alaska; Palmer, Nome, Barrow, Anchorage, Fairbanks and overseas such as in Brazil, Thailand, Israel, Siberia, South Africa and Nicaragua, mostly as a volunteer. In1989, she earned a BS in Psychology, graduating Magna Cum Laude at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks as well as earned an MA in Western Esotericism with Merit from Exeter University, Exeter, England in 2008. In 1980 she volunteered to work in a Cambodian refugee camp in Thailand where she met her future husband, Dr. Dennis Dussman, a local dentist. They worked for two years in Barrow, Alaska providing health care to the Inupiaq peoples. They spent many years traveling to different Alaskan villages such as Fort Yukon, Noatak, Selawik, Northway, Tetlin, Dot Lake, Tanacross and Tok to provide dental services to the Native people in the villages. In 1991 she was called to shamanize. She has taught numerous workshops in different Alaskan communities on a variety of subjects such as shamanism, the emotions, death and dying, spiritual cleansing, drum making, and transmutation work as well as overseas in Ireland and Greece. She was a member of the faculty for the Foundation for Shamanic Studies since 1996 to 2008. In 2001 she was made the Alaska Field Associate for the Foundation. In 1993 she founded The Four Winds Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting shamanic and traditional wisdom. The Foundation offers classes, craft nights, seasonal ceremonies, healing work, and community service of a spiritual nature to the people of Alaska.

 

Similarly, Riki Nia Nia of New Zealand, Director Maori Health, CCDHB and Chair, Tumu Whakarae will present some of the health service innovations/best practices in placed to accelerate performance in key Maori Health Indicator priority areas such as cardiovascular risk assessment, Immunisation, Cancer Screening (Breast & Cervical) and Smoking Advice as well as some of the initiatives related to the acceleration of the achievement of better Maori health outcomes which includes the role and function of Tumu Whakarae (National DHB Strategic Reference Group), Standardised Maori Health Plans and Performance Monitoring Framework in place to monitor and leverage accelerated performance of the system, The Maori Health Workforce Development Program entitled Kia Ora Hauora (largest in country) implemented to accelerate the development and progression of more Maori into health related careers and the Biennial Maori Health Development Conference to promote and build on Maori health achievements as well as the implementation of Tikanga Best Practice Guidelines across NZ hospitals to guide culturally responsive services.

 

As part of an added bonus to the event, we co-organise a satellite symposium entitled: From Broome to Berrima - Building Capacity Australian-Wide in Indigenous Offender Health Research with several speakers showcasing a series of various research initiatives to improve Indigenous Offender Health outcomes. Dr. Nerelle Poroch of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service ACT has worked in Aboriginal research for eight years and has contributed to the Footprints in Time Study, Trachoma Studies, Sexual Health research and an AIATSIS Grant Study about Aboriginal Youth communicating with Centrelink. Her research work at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service has been in the areas of Aboriginal prison health care and the connection between spirituality, social and emotional wellbeing. Prof. Mick Dodson, AM Chief Investigator IOHR-CBG & Director of the National Centre for Indigenous Studies ACT is a member of the Yawuru peoples – the traditional owners of land and waters in the Broome area of the southern Kimberley region of Western Australia. He is Director of the National Centre for Indigenous Studies at the ANU and Professor of law at the ANU College of Law. He was Australia’s first Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner and was Counsel assisting the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. He was a member of the Board of Trustees of the United Nations 6 Indigenous Voluntary Fund and later an expert member on the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. He is a chief investigator and member of the NHMRC-funded Indigenous Offender Health Research Capacity Building Group.

As the conference has been centred around the sharing of information, increasing network and access to programs, what a great opportunity it will be to have more than fifty (50) speakers gathered in one roof, over the course of this three - day conference, from various countries of Indigenous Australia freely sharing knowledge, ideas based on results of research studies, yarning about personal journeys and interacting with more than two hundred registered delegates. With all these, this is a conference that should not be missed. REGISTER NOW!

 

To register online or for further information, please visit the conference website: www.indigenoushealth.net or email us at admin@indigenoushealth.net.

 

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MEDIA RELEASE September 19, 2013

The convenor of the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference scheduled on the 25th to 27th of November 2013 at Pullman Cairns International Hotel formally invites you to attend this year’s event. The conference agenda has now being finalized with more than fifty (50) featured speakers whom will be presenting various results of research studies as well as different community and national programs implemented in closing the gap in Indigenous Health. As the conference has been centred around the sharing of information, increasing network and access to programs, what a great opportunity it will be to have more than fifty (50) speakers gathered in one roof, over the course of this three - day conference, from various countries of Indigenous Australia freely sharing knowledge, ideas based on results of research studies and yarning about personal journeys relative to improving Indigenous Health.

 

Among the prominent speakers on the opening day will be Julie Tongs, CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service ACT. Julie, a Wiradjuri woman worked in the Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health as Assistant Advisor to the Honourable Robert Tickner MP, advising both the Minister on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs at the national level and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission. These areas of work and advocacy have equipped Julie to excel in her role as Winnunga CEO over the last 15 years.

 

Marcus 'Mark' Pedro was born on Thursday Island and grew up on Moa Island in the Torres Strait.  Throughout his career, Mark have been a fisherman, railway labourer, youth worker, professional DJ, dance fitness trainer and Community Police Officer, the first Community Police Officer to become a Queensland Police Officer in 1992. Marcus co-authored a book entitled ‘Three Warriors Within’, which is his life’s story. He gained his Diploma of Justice Studies in 1991 and had been a Board Member for the First Contact Aboriginal Corporation for Youth. Marcus is currently the Project Officer for Queensland Health’s Indigenous Respiratory Outreach Care (IROC) Program.   

 

Lydia Mainey is a Public Health Nurse and Academic at CQUniversity. Lydia has spent many years working in isolated and remote First Nation communities in Australia and Canada. She has post-graduate qualifications in Tropical Nursing, Public Health and Health Promotion. She is co-ordinates a range of Sexual Health short courses for professionals and non-professionals.  Lydia works in collaboration with the local Women’s Health Centre ensuring that her programs meet the community’s needs. 

 

Additionally, we have guest speakers coming from all walks of life, both non-Indigenous and Indigenous Health professionals as well as grassroots community members.  Paul Bourke  is currently the manager of Health Services at The Salvation Army Crisis Services in St Kilda, Victoria. He currently oversees an AOD treatment coordination service, a home-based withdrawal program, AOD counselling, a 24-hour needle and syringe program and  a primary health service for people who inject drugs, engage in street sex work and/or are homeless. Paul originally qualified and worked as an occupational therapist in mental health settings throughout Australia and overseas before joining The Salvation Army as the manager of a youth and family crisis accommodation centre. 

Patsi-Anne Mawn is a Jaularoi woman born on Mandandanji traditional lands in Roma, South West Queensland. She gained her Diploma in Aboriginal and Torres Islander Legal Studies in 2010, employed as a health worker, project officer and have coordinated a number of programs, including the Indigenous patient journey for Care Connect Program and the Well Person’s Health Program.  Patsi is currently the Senior Project Officer for the Indigenous Respiratory Outreach Care (IROC) Program, Queensland Department of Health. 

Dr. Jill Guthrie is a descendant of the Wiradjuri people of western NSW, and has lived in Canberra ACT for over twenty years. Following graduation from the MAE Program, Jill worked as an academic member of the MAE staff and continues to work in the program. In March 2009, she was appointed as a Research Fellow at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) in Canberra, working on health-related research projects with a particular focus on the relationship between criminal justice and health. She is a member of the NHMRC-funded Indigenous Offender Health Research Capacity Building Group.

As part of an added bonus to the event, we are co-organising a satellite symposium with a series of various initiatives to be presented on Indigenous Offender Health Research. Prof. Tony Butler, Chief Investigator IOHR-CBG NSW  is head of the Justice Health Research Program at the Kirby Institute. He has worked in the prison health research area since the mid-1990s. He conducted two population based prisoner health surveys in 1996 and 2001, two  survey of adolescent offenders, the largest mental health survey of prisoners in Australia, a world’s first RCT of a smoking cessation in prison,  and research into traumatic brain injury among prisoners. He is Co-Convenor of the Justice Health Special Interest Group in the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA).

Ms. Dina Saulo is a Master of Applied Epidemiology scholar with the National Centre for Epidemiology & Population Health at ANU. Her field placement during her candidature is with the Kirby Institute. She has previously worked at the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW (AH&MRC) where she coordinated the NSW Aboriginal sexual and reproductive health program. Dina has had experience working with a number of marginalised populations in a public health capacity with a particular focus on sexual health, STIs, BBV & HIV/AIDS. Dina is a team investigator and member of the Indigenous Offender Health Research Capacity Building Group.

Dr. Paul Simpson is well experienced in various research field including health, marginalisation and identity, as well as public health and civil society organisations. He has worked in child and adolescent mental health and sexual health sectors in research and HIV health promotion roles. Paul’s PhD examined relationships between hepatitis C identities and public health and community sector discourses. He currently works as a researcher with the Justice Health Research Program at the Kirby Institute and is the research coordinator for the NHMRC-funded Indigenous Offender Health Research Capacity Building Group.

THE CONFERENCE AGENDA

1ST DAY  (NOVEMBER 25, 2013)

08:00    Delegates Registration

08:30    Welcome to Country & Opening Remarks  

09:00    Keynote: Building Bridges for Indigenous Health - Where to from here?

09:40    Keynote: Indigenous Holistic Model of Care - Which one works?

10:20    Morning Tea

10:50    Breakout Sessions: Proper Nutrition is the Key to Success in ATSI Health

      Room A: Aboriginal Community Food Programs VIC

      Room B: Food Across Cultures NT

      Room C: Healthy Kids, Healthy Future Program NSW

11:30    Breakout Sessions: Collaborative Practices in Service Delivery

      Room A: Mainstream - ATSI Health Partnerships VIC

      Room B: Collaborative participation - The Hub of Action Research SA            

      Room C: Building a Collaborative Indigenous Health Service QLD

12:10    Lunch Break              

01:10    Breakout Sessions: Community Engagement Approaches & Innovations 

      Room A:  Telling and Re-Telling Stories: A Narrative Family Intervention NT

      Room B: The Tjurkurrpa Heals - A Circle Tradition ACT

      Room C: Life's "Core Business" for Our Future Families

01:50    Breakout Sessions: Chronic Disease Management in Indigenous Health 

      Room A: Country Bound - City Endocrinologists Expand Boundaries SA

      Room B: Opening Pathways to Self Management of Chronic Diseases NSW

                 

      Room C: Indigenous Respiratory Outreach (IROC) Program QLD

02:30    Afternoon Tea

03:00    Keynote: Indigenous Ear Health - Planning for Sustainable Social Impact 

03:40    Keynote: Dream Catchers and Diabetes - How the Kehiw Women's Group reduced isolation and imparted positive messages to women in a remote First Nation's community in Canada.

 

2ND DAY  (NOVEMBER 26,2013)

08:30    Registration

09:00    Keynote:  Accessing Access Health

09:40    Keynote:  Dementia in Indigenous Population 

 

10:20    Morning Tea                           

10:50    Breakout Sessions: Delivering Outcomes in Indigenous Health

    Room A: Nooka Murrook ‘to give goodness’- A Palliative Care Approach NSW 

    Room B: Machado Joseph Disease and MJD Foundation programs in NT

    Room C: Indigenous Diabetic Foot Program

 

11:30    Breakout Sessions: Indigenous Women's Health Programs

      Room A:  Strong, Black & Deadly-Koori women organising for Better Health NSW

      Room B:   Translational Research + CQI to increase Pap Smear Numbers ACT    

      Room C:  The Marulu Project- A Continuing Story of Fetal Alcohol Study

12:10    Lunch Break

01:10    Breakout Sessions: Working in Our Community              

      Room A:  Access Services for Koories (ASK) VIC

      Room B:  National Auslan Interpreter Booking and Payment service (NABS) QLD

      Room C:  When Waste is not Waste NSW

01:50    Breakout Sessions: Working in Our Community 

      Room A: Yarning about Polycystic Ovary Syndrome VIC

      Room B: Dev't. of Strong Living Scale - Impact of ABI in ATSI Australians QLD

                 

      Room C: Working Systemically–What does this mean in remote communities? NT

02:30   Afternoon Tea

03:00   Keynote: Enough is Enough Domestic Violence Campaign- This is Our Story

03:40   Keynote: Journey of Life - A Maori Woman's Story

All work and no play makes for a very dull conference. As such we are organizing a ‘Koorioke Night On a Dinner Cruise’ aboard one of Cairns luxurious fleet as part of the conference networking dinner. It’s a great way of unwinding and de-stressing and who knows we may even discover a superstar!

 

19:30   Networking Conference Dinner Cruise                      

3RD DAY  (NOVEMBER 27, 2013)

08:30  Registration

09:00  Keynote: Aboriginal Nursing Cadetship Program

09:40  Keynote: Indigenous Youth Mental Health - Community Integration Team

10:20  Morning Tea

10:50  Keynote: Sharing Successes – The Story of the WA Indigenous Storybook

11:30  Keynote: It's More Than Just Having a Baby NSW

12:10  Lunch Break

01:00  Keynote: Australian Bureau of Statistics Indigenous Health Survey Report    

A Symposium: From Broome to Berrima - Building Capacity Australian-Wide in Indigenous Offender Health Research  

01:30  Welcome by IOHR-CBG Session Chair & Introduction

01:40  Aboriginal Medical Services and prisons

01:50  We're struggling in here! : The phase 2 study into the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the ACT Alexander Maconochie Centre and the needs of their families

02:05  Exploring the Pathways to Contact with Juvenile Justice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children: Developing a profile of the risk and protective factors to support a strategy for change

02:20  Social support post-prison release among urban Aboriginal people

02:35  Reducing Indigenous incarceration using Justice Reinvestment: an exploratory case study

02:50  Assessing the public’s views to incarceration vs. non incarceration alternatives using Citizens’ Juries Aboriginal Medical Services and prisons

 

03:00  Afternoon Tea

03:30  Aboriginal Mothers in Prison Project


03:45  Unique patterns of substance-related mortality among Indigenous ex-prisoners: A record linkage study

04:00  Problematic alcohol use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in the offender population.

04:10  Hepatitis C prevalence among Indigenous and non-Indigenous inmates in Qld and NSW

04:20  Hepatitis C treatment and social capital among Indigenous and non-Indigenous prisoners  

04:30  Closing Remarks and Culmination Ceremony: Distribution of Certificates 

PLEASE NOTE:  All keynote and symposium sessions will be happening at the Grand Ballroom. This agenda is subject to change without prior notice, if deemed necessary to maintain continuous and smooth flow of the conference proceedings.  

REGISTRATION

 

With the quality of both papers and programs put forward and included in the conference agenda, numbers are filling fast and vacancies are limited. Hence, we encourage anyone who wishes to attend the conference to register as soon as possible. We have structured our registration in such a way that will save organization's money while at the same time providing a great forum for frank and open discussion. We’ve also negotiated a special conference rate that can only be availed by registered delegates booking their hotel rooms direct at Pullman Cairns International Hotel, Novotel Cairns and Mercure Harbourside Resort.

 

 

For further information, please visit the conference website: www.indigenoushealth.net or email us at admin@indigenoushealth.net .

 

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MEDIA RELEASE August 15, 2013

Seats are now getting very limited for the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference: Building Bridges in Indigenous Health scheduled on the 25th – 27th of November 2013 at Pullman Cairns International Hotel, Cairns QLD with exciting new addition of high caliber guest speakers from all throughout Australia.

The conference highlights the new Disability Care, formerly National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and how this new scheme applies to Indigenous people with disability. Mr. Andrew Fernando is a proud Wailwan man from Central NSW, the only Koorie planner for the National Disability Insurance Scheme in the country will be speaking about how to move forward under this scheme and will be seeking to gain some valuable feedback as to the national role out of this scheme in our Indigenous communities so that Indigenous people who have a disability and their family carer will not be overlooked, particularly in rural remote location. Andrew is strongly passionate to lobby, in conjunction with the First Peoples Disability Group, for a stronger movement advocating for our mob that live with a disability and the importance to do this right now and not wait until we fall through the cracks.

Furthermore Prof. Kerry Arabena, a descendant of the Meriam people of the Torres Strait and the inaugural Chair of the National Congress of Australia's First Peoples as well as the inaugural CEO of the Lowitja Institute and recipient of the prestigious JG Crawford Prize for Academic Excellence at Australian National University will be speaking about Accessing Access Health with Mr. Paul Bourke, Manager at Salvation Army Crisis Centre and Ms. Judy Hanley, Aboriginal Access Worker where their program focuses on how a mainstream service responded to community needs through partnerships and collaboration where services are guided by Aboriginal people to address community health needs.

In addition, the timely release of the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey 2013 report will be announced by Ms. Julie Nankervis, Director of Australian Bureau of Statistics from the National Centre for ATSI Statistics on the third day of the conference, giving delegates first hand information on Indigenous health survey nationwide.

Moreover, a team of Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars from New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia and the ACT will showcase progress of their five (5) year project entitled: “From Broome to Berrima: building capacity Australia-wide in Indigenous offender health research” wherein researchers and investigators currently work on projects in the areas of mental health, alcohol and other drug use, blood-borne viruses, Justice Reinvestment, social support post-release and Juvenile Justice pathways.

Indeed this 3-day event will offer a truly unique experience for all delegates. Attending this event presents an opportunity for workers in the field of Indigenous health to form new alliances and opportunities at the same time gaining an intricate working knowledge of presented successful community programs and efficient strategy implementation.  

To register for the event, please register online at http://www.indigenoushealth.net/registration.htm or contact us at admin@indigenoushealth.net.

 

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NEWSLETTER JUNE 15, 2013

‘Indigenous Offender Health Research Capacity Building Group (IOHR-CBG) bridges gap in Indigenous Health’

With great line up of more than 30 speakers and the end of financial year coming upon us, this is now the ideal time to register to attend the conference so that your staff’s professional development expenditure fits into this year’s spending budget as we are extending our June registration rates for invoices issued until 15th of July to allow for end of financial year’s last minute bookings, an attempt to give a chance for grassroots Indigenous Health workers to participate.

One of the highlights of this year’s conference is that on the 27th November 2013, Ms. Julie Nankervis, Director of Australian Bureau of Statistics from the National Centre for ATSI Statistics, Northern Territory will announce the first release of the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey 2013 report, giving delegates the most up to date information on Indigenous health survey nationwide.

Furthermore representatives from the northern hemisphere will also be sharing different First Nations’ health pathways implemented in various Indigenous communities in Canada. Bella Ribbonleg of Canada will be co-presenting with Ms. Lydia Mainey of Queensland on a keynote session entitled Dream Catchers and Diabetes: How the Kehiw Women's Group reduced isolation and imparted positive health messages to women in a remote First Nation's community in Northern Canada. Ms. Nathalie Lachance will also be presenting her paper entitled Shared Past, Different Meanings: Looking for a Path Forward in Working Together which outlines the relationship between First Nations and the federal government in terms of the delivery of health services to First Nations communities - an area of Canadian public policy that has experienced a fairly high level of change over the last century. Nathalie works in Policy and Strategic Planning Team at First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB), Health Canada, Alberta and has participated on a number of initiatives seeking greater collaboration between First Nations communities and First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) and has worked for national Aboriginal organizations.

Moreover, a further development in the conference agenda is the recent collaborative sponsorship established with the Indigenous Offender Health Research Capacity Building Group (IOHR-CBG). Australia has the highest Indigenous incarceration rates in the developed world, which impacts profoundly on Indigenous communities. With offender populations known to endure a greater health burden compared with the general community, there is a need to develop new knowledge in this area to improve health outcomes. The IOHR-CBG team will be joining us at the conference with the whole afternoon sessions on the 3rd day allocated to sharing their findings as well as discussing issues, challenges and successes of their research project. Outcomes with which will include better health services for Indigenous offenders, and more generally improved health and wellbeing for those in the community from which they come, and to which they return.

Consequently, Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars from New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia and the ACT received a capacity building grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council for a 5 year project titled: “From Broome to Berrima: building capacity Australia-wide in Indigenous offender health research”. This project led to the formation of the Indigenous Offender Health Capacity Building Group (IOHR-CBG) consisting of emerging and established researchers. The central objective of the IOHR-CBG is to develop the knowledge and skills of a cohort of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers (Team Investigators) through collaborative research work, secondments to research centres and mentoring.  Investigators currently work on projects in the areas of mental health, alcohol and other drug use, blood-borne viruses, Justice Reinvestment, social support post-release and Juvenile Justice path-ways.

In addition to this with the renewal of the closing the gap agreement, by the time the federal election have taken place a new round of funding for the closing the gap initiative will be announced no matter whether the government be Labour or the Coalition. As such, the next one to three years will be an interesting period of time in Indigenous Health affairs. This is why this conference is extremely valuable for all aspects of Indigenous Health and businesses throughout this country. With this in mind, we extend the special invitation throughout Australia to participate in the conference and to be part of this gathering.

Indeed this 3-day event will offer a truly unique experience for all delegates. Attending this event presents an opportunity for workers not only in the field of Indigenous health but also in Indigenous criminal justice health research network to form new alliances and opportunities at the same time gaining an intricate working knowledge of presented successful community programs and efficient strategy implementation.

To register for the event, please contact us at admin@indigenoushealth.net or visit the website: www.indigenoushealth.net

 

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APRIL 2013

Exciting Guest Speakers for 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference in Cairns on 25 – 27 November

MEES Australia in cooperation with the Eduarda Foundation, Inc. launches the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference to be held in Cairns on the 25th – 27th November, 2013. The overwhelming response of the Call for Papers clearly indicates the interests of organizations and individuals working in the field of Indigenous Health to improve the Indigenous people’s health throughout this nation.

Within ten weeks of first publishing the event, we've received dozens of papers from every states and territories and registration numbers are also filling fast; hence, we encourage anyone who wishes to attend the conference to register as soon as possible. More than 80 % of the submitted papers are from community based organizations, wishing to share successes in programs implemented within their communities.

One of the featured speakers is Ms. JULIE NANKERVIS (Northern Territory), Director of the National Centre for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics who will be presenting the first release of the Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey; JUNE OSCAR (Western Australia), CEO and Chair of the Marninwarntikura Women’s Resource Centre will be presenting the continuing story of the Marulu Project in tackling issues of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. In addition, June is a member of the Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre and also instrumental in making the voices of Indigenous Australian women heard at the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (March 2009).

 In addition to the featured speakers and after due deliberation, the following presenters and their respective papers had been accepted for presentation during the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference:

  • ANNETTE LOADSMAN HUCKS (Queensland) works as a Registered Midwife for 18 years and is currently working for Qld Health at Cairns Base Hospital. She will be speaking about Life's "Core Business" Program for future Indigenous families.
  • GARY ROBINSON and CAROLIN STOCK (Northern Territory) will be presenting the result of their research program regarding the Use of Narrative and Drawing in a Group Intervention with Parents and Children in a Remote Aboriginal Community. Gary is the Deputy Director of the Centre for Child Development and Education at Menzies in Darwin and led the team undertaking national consultations to inform the development of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy on behalf of the Australian Government whereas Carolin obtained her Master’s in Social Work from the University for Applied Science in Munich, Germany. She has over 15 years experience in delivering therapeutic group programs for children and families and has been trauma counsellor at the Sexual Assault Resource Centre in Perth.
  • JACINTA COLLINS (Victoria) has a Master of Health Science and Graduate Diploma of Health Administration. She will be speaking about the Access Services for Koories (ASK) Program in Victoria which assists Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with chronic disease or have complex needs to access culturally safe health care services. She will be highlighting underutilization of primary health care services is strongly associated with poorer health outcomes especially in Indigenous families.
  • JANELLE BROWN and SYLVIA CAMPBELL (New South Wales) will be presenting their successful program how Strong, Black & Deadly Koori women organised better health in the Illawarra where they’re of the view that liberation from negative cultural connotations and fostering pride between Koori women for their culture and tradition is crucial in regard to achieving a better health future for Koori women and girls. Janelle was also awarded the Regional NAIDOC Aboriginal Worker of the Year Award.
  • AUNTY CORAL WILSON and HEPSIBAH FRANCIS, M.Sc Nsg, MBA (South Australia) will be speaking about how collaborative participation in the Hub of Comorbidity Action Research plays an important role in the successes of their CAN program. Hepsi has done Masters in Nursing and Masters in Business Administration in Health Service and has worked as a Vice Principal for The Madras Medical Mission College of Nursing, India whereas Aunty Coral is a respected Elder and Aboriginal Cultural Advisor/Community Researcher of CAN Research Project. She is a Founding Member of the SA Grannies’ Group; Sits on the SA Nunga Court and is Cultural Advisor to the Drug and Alcohol Services of SA (DASSA).   
  • PROFESSOR ELIZABETH ELLIOTT (New South Wales) will be co-presenting with June Oscar about the continuing story of Marulu Project – where they’ll showcase innovative practices innovative practices introduced to cater for the children and families affected with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Professor Elliott is a Consultant Paediatrician at Westmead and a NHMRC Practitioner Fellow. She is Founder/Director of the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit.
  • JODI DYER & NERESSA JOHNSTON (Queensland) will be speaking about Building a Collaborative Indigenous Health Service. Jodi works as the Advanced Indigenous Health Worker for Maternal and Infant Health at Redcliffe Hospital whereas Neressa is the Indigenous Liaison Officer at Redcliffe Hospital and a proud descendent of Kalkdoon (Grandmother) and Pitta Pitta (Grandfather) people from North West Queensland.
  • SUNNI WILSON (Western Australia) is a Project Officer at the Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia (PHAIWA) where she coordinates The Western Australian Indigenous Storybook and is a journalist who has previously worked at ABC Perth and the Sunday Times Newspaper before joining Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia in April 2012.
  • JASON WARNOCK (Queensland) managed a project for SARRAH (Services for Australian Rural and Remote Allied Health) funded by the Department of Health and Ageing; to develop resources to assist with the management of the diabetic foot in Indigenous communities which led to the Indigenous Diabetic Foot Program. He served as the inaugural Chair of the Podiatry Board and recently appointed to the Primary Care Committee of the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care.
  • DR. SARAH MARES and YOMEI JONES (Northern Territory) will jointly present the successes and challenges of the Let’s Start Parent-Child Project. Dr. Mares is an infant, child and family psychiatrist, Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Child Development and Education, and Clinical Consultant to the NT Office of Children and Families whereas Yomei is  the Project Coordinator for the Let's Start Project at the Centre for Child Development and Education, Menzies School of Health Research in Darwin.
  • JILL Mc ENTEE (South Australia) is the Director of Country Bound at RDWA (Rural Doctors Workforce Agency) in SA. She has a background in occupational therapy and has worked in a variety of fields including community health promotion, mental health, vocational rehabilitation, lecturing and management. Jill will share stories & challenges encountered by rural visiting health workforce to improve the health of rural communities in SA.  
  • LIBBY MASSEY (MJD Foundation - Northern Territory) will tell the story behind her establishing the Machado Joseph Disease (MJD) Foundation programs in the Northern Territory. She grew up at Angurugu on Groote Eylandt where she has known MJD, then “Groote Eylandt Syndrome’. She studied Occupational Therapy, Masters in Public Health and Law and is co-founder and Director of Research and Community Services of the MJD Foundation.
  • CAROL CHAPMAN (Alzheimer’s Australia - Queensland) will be speaking about dementia affecting Indigenous communities. She will also share her life story as a carer of her father with dementia. Carol is the Special Access Liaison Officer focusing on Indigenous, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse, rural and remote groups within the lower third of Queensland. 
  • TERORI HAREKO-SAMIOS & RHONDA GARAD (Victoria) will jointly showcase their developed resources, Yarning about Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Rhonda is a health writer and works for Jean Hailes for Women’s Health, which takes evidence-based health information and transforms it into practical, easy to understand resources for the community and health professionals whereas Terori is an acclaimed Aboriginal artists and the ATSI Women’s Support Worker at the Royal Women’ s Hospital in Melbourne.
  • CLAIR MEDHURST, LLB (Hons), FAICD (Western Australia) is the Director of EON Foundation Inc whom will be highlighting the works of EON Thriving Communities Program in preventing chronic diseases, where children in remote indigenous communities  are more susceptible to life threatening diseases due to poor health and diet. EON teach people how to grow fruit and vegetables and how to prepare them for eating – a simple answer for a not so simple problem.
  • LYDIA MAINEY (QLD) & BELLA RIBBONLEG (CANADA) will be jointly presenting how the Canadian First Nation’s Kehiw Women's Group reduced isolation and imparted positive health messages to women in a remote First Nation's community. Lydia is a Public Health Nurse and Academic at CQ University and has spent many years working in isolated and remote First Nation communities in Australia and Canada.  
  • DR. SUSAN COLLES (Northern Territory) will focus her presentation on human nutrition, eating behaviour and weight management.  She has accumulated over 10 years national and international experience in clinical dietetic and nutrition counselling roles; over six years working in nutrition research; and several years’ experience in community development, health management and educational roles in Southern Africa and India.   
  • ELIZABETH TEMPLE (Queensland) is a Sign Language interpreter with NABS, the National Auslan Interpreter Booking and Payment Service. The NABS commitment is to provide interpreters for deaf people accessing medical appointments, facilitating equity and access to improve health outcomes for clients. Liz has encountered much diversity in working with Indigenous deaf people in the Northern Territory and her work includes travelling to remote areas such as Borroloola, Daly River and Gapuwiyak.
  • DR. MELANIE DORRINGTON (ACT), GP Registrar and Associate Lecturer will present the result of her research on combining translational research with continuous quality improvement to increase Pap smear numbers at an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. Dr Melanie has a B.Biomedical Science (Hons) (Uni of Newc.), MBBS (USyd), Cert of Sexual and Reproductive Health from Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service and Australian National University
  • KIMI HALAPIO (NSW), the Cultural Coordinator of Enough is Enough Anti Violence Movement Inc. will share her story and will be highlighting her resilience as she moved from Domestic Violence Victim - Survivor - Thriver and encourage others to move forward and follow her footsteps to a brighter future. Kimi was born in a small country town in NSW as a Wiradjuri woman in a home where alcohol was very dominant in the family with her father being physically abusive as well.  Kimi began a life of welfare kids and alcohol. Kim runs a program called, "Your Life Your Responsibility' and she’s also an Aboriginal Artist, utilises her artistic skills to develop her "Silent Anger" program for young people in detention.
  • ANNE PRINCE (NSW), Director of Anne Prince Consulting will be sharing her works with indigenous communities in APY Lands of SA and Torres Strait communities on innovative waste practices. Anne Prince has over 30 years’ experience in waste management working in and with regional, rural, remote and indigenous communities at local, regional, state and international levels gained in Australia, Europe and Asia.

Furthermore, the conference also lined up several international Indigenous speakers from New Zealand, Canada and Africa. VARINA FLAVELL (NEW ZEALAND) with Tribal Affiliations (Ngati Whatua, Ngapuhi, Ngati Tamatera) from Whangarei New Zealand will be presenting Maori Health programs as well as her personal journey as an Indigenous Maori health practitioner; BELLA RIBBONLEG (CANADA) will be presenting how the Canadian First Nation’s Kehiw Women's Group reduced isolation and imparted positive health messages to women in a remote First Nation's community; TOLOTEA LANUMATA (TONGA / NZ) who will be sharing the result of her research on Pacific perspectives on promoting Indigenous Pacific children’s healthy eating in Aotearoa, health promotion and the investigation of ethnic inequalities in Aotearoa. Tolotea has a teaching background but moved to research when she migrated to Aotearoa New Zealand in 2005 and received a Pacific PhD scholarship from the Health Research Council of New Zealand.

It is so pleasing to see both government and non-government organizations participating in choosing the agenda and as delegates as well. For after all, this conference is about sharing of information on successful Indigenous health programs existing and being implemented all over Australia and encouraging inter-agency networking either at a local, state and national level.

We encourage anyone interested in attending the conference to register early as numbers are filling fast. We’ve structured our registration in such a way that will save organization's money while at the same time providing a great forum for frank and open discussion. To register or for further details, please visit the event’s website: www.indigenoushealth.net or email us at admin@indigenoushealth.net

 

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"Calling for Papers for the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference"

Following the successful staging of the 2012 National Indigenous Health Conference in the Gold Coast, the event organizer are now calling for paper submission for the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference: Many Pathways, One Outcome to be held in Cairns on November 25-27, 2013.

The event is designed to bring together both government and non-government agencies who are working in the field of Indigenous health with the belief that working together in bridging the gap between the state of Indigenous Health as compared to the health of mainstream Australians. It is envisage that up to 200 - 300 delegates will attend the 2013 National Indigenous Health Conference in Cairns.

For many years, the provision of Aboriginal health services had been broken and fragmented when it comes to delivery of primary health services. There were government providers and grassroots communities’ Aboriginal medical services where in many cases, duplication of services occurred. However over time, service providers have joined forces in not just the physical provision of services but also in such fields as research, health education and even the training of staffs in order to improve Indigenous health, in general.

This gathering will highlight some of the existing indigenous health programs currently implemented in Aboriginal communities and provide a unique opportunity for delegates and speakers to see the power of people networking together in one place, at one time with similar goals and exchange information regarding the successes and challenges that workers involve in implementing Aboriginal health programs faced. Hence, we encourage grassroots communities to participate and present their existing, successful programs during the event. Papers are now being called for with the closing date on January 30, 2013. To further ensure the continuous success of the conference, an Indigenous working group is being established to advise on correct adherence to cultural equilibrium.                              

CALL FOR PAPERS

Guidelines in Submitting Paper:

Papers should not contain offensive language and take in account cultural sensitivities of host country.

Papers may treat the themes in a manner that contributes to a further discussion of conference aims.

Conference papers must be presented in the finish format not less than 90 days prior to the event.

First closing date for papers is on January 30, 2013. Papers that are not chosen in the first round may be resubmitted in the second round.

Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word format.

Authors of papers presented at the conference will be formally notified of their acceptance.

Registration fee of $426 will apply to all persons submitting papers payable upon acceptance of papers.

Papers should explore ways in which the themes show up in the philosophy of the conference.

All papers must be presented in a positive and informative light.

For more information, please contact us by email at admin@indigenoushealth.net 

 


 
 
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MEDIA RELEASE OCTOBER 2012:

2012 National Indigenous Health Conference at Watermark Hotel & Spa, Gold Coast on December 5-7, 2012

Seats are now getting very limited for the 2012 National Indigenous Health Conference scheduled on the 5th – 7th of December 2012 at the Watermark Hotel & Spa in the Gold Coast. The event committee has invited several international guest speakers to present Indigenous health programs being implemented in Indigenous communities of Canada and New Zealand whom will be sharing various pathways, insights, results of research studies and different models of practice in the field of Indigenous Health.

 

Among the prominent international speakers are the representatives of The Kotahitanga Whanau Ora Collective - a network of four Maori Health, Social Services and Education providers based in South Auckland, New Zealand/Aotearoa which provides services to more than 20,000 people and has embarked on a challenging journey to design and transform the way it delivers services to whanau/families through a new family-centred model of care called “Mana Tiaki”.  This model is premised on Maori values and kaupapa (philosophy and platform) and serves to improve the outcomes of families who have significant and multi-faceted needs.  The Kotahitanga Collective will be sharing their insights and are keen to support the overall intent of the conference in promoting indigenous models and approaches to reduce the gap in Indigenous health. 

 

Te Puea Winiata of Ngati Rangi Ranginui tribe from Tauranga is the CEO of Turuki Health Care, a Maori provider of health, social and wellbeing services in South Auckland and Chair of the CEO Steering Group of the Kotahitanga Whanau Ora Collective. She also currently holds several national positions as Chair of Te Rau Matatini Trust, a member of the Henry Rongomau Bennett Foundation and a member of the Matua Raki Alcohol and Other Drug Workforce Development Advisory Group. Te Puea previously worked as the Service Manager, Māori Mental Health Services, Auckland District Health Board; a Senior Analyst for the Ministry of Health; a Māori Health Advisor, He Kamaka Oranga, Auckland District Health Board.  She is also an experienced social worker, social work senior practitioner, and a manager and counselor in the alcohol and drug field.

 

Natasha Kauika-Stevens of Nga Rauru, Ngati Tuwharetoa me Ngati Kahungungu is the CEO of Te Kaha O Te Rangatahi Trust, a Maori Youth Health and Wellbeing Provider in South Auckland and is also the Change Manager for the Kotahitanga Whanau Ora Collective. Natasha has worked in the New Zealand health sector for the last 12 years and is experienced in Community Development, Maori Health Funding and Planning roles. In her current CEO role, Natasha manages an innovative youth-focused organisation that specialises in Sexual Health Education in Maori and non-Maori Schools (e.g. Secondary, Kura Kaupapa Maori and Alternative Education Centres).  Te Kaha also provides a Teenage Parenting Service for Youth aged 12- 19 years of age and a Mama & Pepi (Mother & Baby) Support Service.

       

Sharon Shea of Ngati Ranginui, Ngati Hine, Ngati Haua and Ngati Hako is the Principal Consultant for Shea Pita and Associates and is a Specialist Advisor to the Kotahitanga Whanau Ora Collective. Sharon graduated from both Oxford & Auckland University with an MSc in Comparative Social Policy (Distinction) and Bachelor of Laws and Arts and began her career in 1993 as a lawyer at Kensington Swan then moved into the health sector where she held a range of senior management roles in government and non-government organisations focused on Maori health improvement.  In 2000, Sharon worked in England with the NHS and after she completed her postgraduate studies, returned to New Zealand and run a successful consulting business. She is widely recognised as a leader in the field of strategy, outcomes framework development, project and change management and systems design.  Sharon is particularly interested in Maori Development and reducing health, social, education and economic inequalities across all populations.  She holds a variety of Board memberships for both private and public/not-for-profit organisations and, as requested, fulfils Ministerial appointed roles within New Zealand.

Furthermore representatives from the northern hemisphere will also be sharing different Indigenous health pathways implemented in various Indigenous communities in Canada. Dr. Matthew ‘Matt’ Gustafson from the University of British Columbia, Canada will be presenting the results of their multi-disciplinary research study showing positive correlation between oral health and overall physical health; recommending oral health providers should consider physical fitness and systemic health in order to achieve improvement in oral health in First Nations communities. Matt attended the University of Victoria where he majored in Chemistry then entered the DDS program at the University of Alberta. Following graduation from dental school, he spent a year as a resident in the UBC general practice residency program and is currently working as the senior resident in this program. In 2011 and 2012, he worked at Haida Gwaii aboriginal communities where he conducted research on the relationship between overall fitness and oral health. Matt was also previously published in Canadians for Health Research about alcoholism.

 

Doris Peltier is a publicly disclosed Aboriginal HIV-positive from Wikwemikong First Nations on Manitoulin Island. Since being diagnosed with AIDS in 2001, she has been involved in HIV/AIDS activism within the Aboriginal community at the regional and national level. She has served two terms on the Board of Directors for the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN). Her current role as Aboriginal Women and Leadership Project Coordinator involves coordinating a consultation process with 300+ Aboriginal women in 11 cities across Canada which resulted in the development of a national strategy to address Aboriginal women's HIV and AIDS issues. She also played a pivotal role in the establishment of CAAN VOW (Voices of Women), a standing committee of 14 strong Aboriginal women who will monitor the strategic action for five years and is currently serving as Vice-Chair of the Canadian Treatment Action Council (CTAC) - a national NGO run by and for people living with HIV/AIDS, including those who are co-infected which promotes informed public policy and builds awareness on issues that impede access to treatment and health care for people living with HIV/AIDS. Doris also heads CTAC’s Aboriginal Working Group (AWG) to address treatment and access issues for Aboriginal people living with HIV. She will be presenting a keynote session entitled ‘Creating Safe Spaces for Women Living with HIV: Utilizing an Indigenous Sharing Circle Model to Engage and Build Capacity for Women’ with her co-speaker, Carrie Martin.

 

Carrie Martin is a Mi'gmaq woman from Listuguj, Canada completed her B.A. in Applied Human Sciences at Concordia University and a B.S.W. at McGill University. She spent the past 12 years working in the field of Aboriginal women's health and is the current Holistic Health Coordinator at the Native Women's Shelter of Montreal (NWSM) where she facilitates HIV and Hepatitis prevention activities in prisons. Carrie is a member of the Montreal Collective for Girls and Women in Conflict with the Law and at a national level, she’s a member of the Reference Group for the International Centre for Infectious Diseases, the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases and participated in the Health Council of Canada's project "Understanding and Improving First Nations, Inuit and Métis Health in Canada" to discuss cultural competency and safety in urban health care. Recently, she became a member of the Community Advisory Board of the Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CHIWOS). Her work in the area of Reproductive Justice has also resulted in her recruitment to La Fédération du Québec pour le planning des naissances' Roundtable Consultation Group. She also serves as a Research Coordinator in the needs assessment in Aboriginal health, the first steps in a long-term initiative to establish the first-ever Aboriginal holistic health centre in Montreal. She remains passionate in developing policy and practices to improve the overall conditions of Aboriginal health. 

 

Indeed this 3-day event will offer a truly unique experience for all delegates. Attending this event presents an opportunity for workers in the field of Indigenous health to form new alliances and opportunities at the same time gaining an intricate working knowledge of presented successful community programs and efficient strategy implementation.  

 

To register for the event, please contact us at admin@indigenoushealth.net or call 41252347.